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US Box Office Report

Posted by Stuart OConnor | Mon, 04/05/2015 - 17:30

Avengers: Age Of Ultron opens big but behind The Avengers

By Rich Matthews

It's an odd occasion when a massive opening weekend gross of $188m, the second biggest domestic US gross in history, is something of disappointment. Why? Because Avengers: Age Of Ultron is the sequel to the current record holder The Avengers, which opened in 2012 to $207.4m.

Speculation was rife in the build-up to release that Ultron would surpass the original Marvel mash-up flick, with advance booking greater than all of the other Marvel movies combined and four times more than The Avengers itself. It resoundingly crushed all comers by accounting for 85 per cent of the entire weekend gross, beating previous record holder Spider-Man 3's 83 per cent. All looked on course on Friday, with Ultron pulling ahead of its progenitor, but Saturday saw it drop 18 per cent lower, which many pundits are blaming on the pay-per-view Mayweather v Pacquiao fight for cannibalising a large chunk of Ultron's key young male demographic.

If this was the case, then Ultron may prove to have sturdier legs than than the pugilists at the centre of the most profitable fight in history. Marvel now has the top three three-day openings of all-time, with Iron Man 3 at three with $174.1m. However, Ultron has not been as universally well received as the first film, so may suffer to the current trend of sequels underperforming in the domestic market and having to increasingly rely on international box office.

Speaking of international revenue, 12 days of release in roughly half of the world before expanding out has seen the Disney/Marvel team-up starring Robert Downey Jr as Iron Man, Chris Evans as Captain America, Chris Hemsworth as Thor, Mark Ruffalo as Bruce Banner/The Hulk, Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow, Jeremy Renner as Hawkeye and new teammembers Aaron Johnson as Quicksilver, Elizabeth Olsen as Scarlet Witch and Paul Bettany as living robot Vision has taken $439m, for a 12-day worldwide total of $626.7m. Not bad overall, but can it compete with Universal's runaway hit Furious 7, which climbed to a mammoth $1.4bn worldwide thanks to its status as only the third movie to ever gross more than $1bn internationally. Even though it grossed $6.3m to come third and raise its homegrown tally to $330.5m, it has passed Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2 to become the fourth-biggest film of all time, nipping at the aforementioned Avengers' heels at $1.5bn. It's possible, though, that Ultron will at least have slowed Furious 7's progress down and may keep it in fourth, even if Ultron itself may or may not approach The Avengers' gross.

Everyone else barely registered, with Blake Lively's Age Of Adaline at two, with $6.3m ($23.4m US), Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 at four ($5.6m, $51.2m, $75.4m), Home at five ($3.3m, $158.1m, $326.2m), Cinderella at six ($2.4m, $194m, $494.3m), Ex Machina ($2.2m, $10.9m, $18.7m), Unfriended eighth ($2m, $28.5m, $32.3m), The Longest Ride ninth ($1.7m, $33.2m, $45.1m), and Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds chasing art in Woman In Gold at 10th ($1.7m, $24.6m, $29.8m).

Next weekend will show whether Age Of Ultron and James Spader's evil AI android has genuine legs or if Reese Witherspoon and Modern Family's Sofia Vergara comedy Hot Pursuit can unseat it at the first hurdle. Let's hope for Disney's sake not, because Mad Max: Fury Road and Pitch Perfect 2 are coming to take on the superheroes on 15 May.

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Small-Screen Jabber 2-8 May

Posted by Louise Bolotin | Sun, 03/05/2015 - 07:12

By Louise Bolotin

Drama
Sheridan Smith is on a career high right now after her recent series of acclaimed roles and Bafta nominations by the bucketload. She stars in The C-Word (Sun, BBC1, 8.30pm), a feature-length biopic of journalist Lisa Lynch, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at 28 and blogged her way through diagnosis and treatment until her death five years later. Co-starring Paul Nicholls (both left), The C-Word is a deeply moving and honest portrait of living with cancer that will resonate with anyone touched by the illness (and yes, Smith did shave her head for filming). If you want an easier emotional ride, try Home Fires (Sun, ITV, 9pm), a six-parter going almost head to head. Based on Jambusters, a warts n all account of the WI by Julie Summers, it’s set in a Cheshire village during WW2 and follows a group of women who want to do their bit for the war effort but are riven by their own hostilities. Stars Francesca Annis and Samantha Bond.

The same night, there’s also The Enfield Haunting (Sun, Sky Living, 9pm), a supernatural six-parter set in 1970s London and starring Juliet Stevenson, Timothy Spall and Matthew Macfadyen. Plenty of things that go bump in the night moving furniture, it’s a classically creepy horrorfest. In a week full of new drama, Paul Abbott’s much anticipated latest series, No Offence (Tues, C4, 9pm) is screened. Abbott, the pen behind Clocking Off, Shameless and State of Play, has set his eight-part tale in Friday Street police station. A comedic police procedural, it stars Joanna Scanlan and Will Mellor in a furiously frank, funny and often filthy eye-opener, with a refreshingly female focus. Scanlan’s DI is a terrifying caricature of your worst boss.

Factual
As the 70th anniversary of the end of WW2 approaches, VE Day: Remembering Victory (Mon, BBC1. 8.30pm) sees some of our most celebrated older generation reminisce. Honor Blackman, Bruce Forsyth, Michael Parkinson and Cleo Laine are among those sharing their childhood memories as Julie Walters narrates. Some of the tales they share are extraordinary, and old B&W family photos provide their own testimony to a changed world. My documentary of the week, however, is The Stranger on the Bridge (Mon, C4, 9pm). When Jonny Benjamin decided to jump off Waterloo Bridge, when gripped with mental illness, a stranger appeared and talked him out of committing suicide. The good Samaritan promptly vanished and six years on, Jonny is trying to find the man who saved his life, using social media to track him down. I don’t do spoilers but I guarantee you will be uplifted by the unfolding events.

Margaret Mountford, Alan Sugar’s schoolmistressy sidekick in The Apprentice, explores the myth and reality of a Greek icon in Sappho: Love and Life on Lesbos (Wed, BBC4, 9pm). A lesbian poet who killed herself after a failed relationship with a man, Sappho is an elusive figure but Mountford does her best to unpick fact from legend.

Music
FFS are a marriage made in heaven – Glaswegian art rockers Franz Ferdinand on a collaborative tour with 70s synth-poppers Sparks. It’s a surprisingly strong and exciting collaboration and the two groups headline on Later Live…with Jools Holland (Tues, BBC2, 10pm). Also on the bill are Alabama Shakes and Lone Bellow.

Arts
Frederick Wiseman’s film National Gallery (Sun, BBC4, 8pm) is an affectionate portrait of this venerable institution. The camera tells the story, slowly panning through the display rooms and exhibits to let the artworks speak for themselves – there’s no presenter or voiceover, just as if you were visiting yourself.

Comedy
A bizarre blend of actors and celebrities populate the ranks of Murder in Successville (Wed, BBC3, 10pm). An incredibly daft but oddly watchable cop sitcom/structured reality show starring Tom Davis, Made in Chelsea star Jamie Laing is pretty much the butt of all jokes. It’s set in a town populated by stars – including Mary Berry, Gordon Ramsay, Deborah Meaden – some of whom run the place, and the surreal premise makes it weirdly compelling viewing.  

Election stuff
Elections are ripe for satire and this one would be lacking without Charlie Brooker’s Election Wipe (Wed, BBC2, 9pm). Brooker punctures every sacred cow about the parties, their manifestos, their campaigns and the TV coverage. The programme was still being compiled as I write but Brooker will be at his most savage, funniest best.

And so to the results on Thursday night. Election 2015 coverage starts on BBC1 and ITV at 9.55pm. The Beeb has David Dimbleby as anchor and the legendary swingometer, with Jeremy Vine, Sophie Raworth and Emily Maitlis among those bringing detailed analysis, Andrew Neil in the bunker grilling the pundits, Laura Kuenssberg unpicks social media while Nick Robinson assesses the impact as results come in. On ITV, Tom Bradby, whose nightly show has been a must-watch during the campaign period, fronts the coverage alongside Julie Etchingham.

Sky’s coverage starts at 9pm with anchor Adam Boulton. Out in the constituencies are Kay Burley, Jeremy Thompson and Anna Botting from polls closing, with Eamonn Holmes and Dermot Murnaghan taking over on Friday morning as the count finishes. Election analyst Professor Michael Thrasher will be analysing the results as they come in. Alternative Election night on Channel 4, from 9pm, is presented by Jeremy Paxman and David Mitchell, who will be hosting topical chat, comedy and comment as the night unfolds, starting with Gogglebox and Last Leg regulars, then more serious coverage from 11pm. If you don’t watch to stay up and watch, go to bed for there’s bugger all else on.

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US Box Office Report

Posted by Stuart OConnor | Sun, 26/04/2015 - 20:58

Furious 7 still first as Avengers: Age Of Ultron sets international territories alight

By Rich Matthews

This was always going to be a quiet weekend at the domestic box office, with most studios take a breather before the summer kicks off in earnest next weekend with the US bow of Disney/Marvel's mega-blockbuster sequel Avengers: Age Of Ultron. So it's no surprise that Universal's Furious 7 continued its winning pace to stay in pole position once again.

Adding $18.3m to take its homegrown total to $320.5m, Furious 7 is a bona fide juggernaut, heading towards $1.5bn at the worldwide box office. Its progress was stymied somewhat by the debut of the aforementioned superhero smorgasbord Age Of Ultron, which positively blasted away all comers with a breathtaking take of $201.2m, which is approximately 44 per cent ahead of the original Avengers – and that's only from 55 per cent of the market, placing first everywhere it opened. With a $215m domestic debut on the cards next weekend, Ultron could be staring down $1bn in less than 10 days on release.

The only new release who posed any kind of challenge to Furious 7 in the US was Blake Lively romantic fantasy The Age of Adeline, which looked like a genuine contender on Friday, when it won the top spot. Alas, the Lakeshore/Sidney Kimmel title dimmed on subsequent days and finished up third with $13.2m. And sitting stoically between Adaline and the FF gang, Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2, starring Kevin James, grossed $15.5m to come second, only dropping 35 per cent from its opening weekend to hit $44m all in ($54.1m worldwide). No other new title even made into the top 10.
That left, from four to 10, Dreamworks alien animation Home ($8.3m, $153.8m US, $281.1m worldwide), Universal low-budget horror Unfriended ($6.2m, $25.2m), Alex Garland's indie sci-fi indie breakout Ex Machina ($5.4m, $6.9m, $14m), Clint's son Scott Eastwood in The Longest Ride ($4.4m, $30.4m, $36.5m), Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart acting tough in prison comedy Get Hard ($3.9m, $84.1m, $99.8m), Disney nature doc Monkey Kingdom ($3.6m, $10.3m) and Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds chasing art in Woman In Gold ($3.5m, $21.6m, $25.5m).

Next weekend is all about how big Avengers: Age Of Ultron can be. The biggest three-day weekend at the US box office stands at just shy of $270m across all films – could Ultron be THAT big?

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Small-Screen Jabber 25 April – 1 May

Posted by Louise Bolotin | Fri, 24/04/2015 - 21:57

By Louise Bolotin

Drama
Juliette Binoche heads a strong cast in the title role of a new translation of Sophocles’ tragedy Antigone (Sun, BBC4, 8pm). It’s a classic tale of a woman being punished for refusing to bow to authority (plus ça change, eh), her fate being to be buried alive. Performed at the Barbican and directed by Ivo van Hove. Martin Shaw is the eponymous Inspector George Gently (Wed, BBC1, 8pm), back for a seventh series and four new feature-length episodes. Peter Flannery’s scriptwriting for the Gently franchise has always been beautifully understated, teasing out the stories in this period cop show. The period setting is part of the attraction, always carefully authentic not just of the look (now the late 60s) but also the mores. The hook is the undeniable on-screen chemistry between Shaw and his sidekick Lee Ingleby, a fine and underrated actor. The opening episodes sees Gently and Sergeant Bacchus investigate the rape of a prostitute, with old attitudes clashing heavily with new ethics.

There’s more period drama with The Game (Thurs, BBC2, 9pm), a classy six-part spy serial set in the 1970s at the height of the Cold War. Brian Cox stars as the MI6 supremo tasked with dealing with a deadly plot revealed by a KGB defector. For anyone who’s seen Le Carré’s Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, it’s well trodden territory – the will they, won’t they hook, the frantic manoeuvrings of internal committees and their petty departmental rivalries, the big themes of trust and fear. It’s well written, acted and directed, and should keep you off the streets for the next few weeks. Gripping. Anzac Girls (Fri, More4, 9pm), also a six-parter, follows the fortunes of six nurses of the Australia and New Zealand Army Corp on duty during WW1. Sent to Egypt the women soon found themselves dealing with the horrific consequences of the Gallipoli campaign. If you watched last year’s Crimson Field on the BBC, you’ll be in familiar territory but don’t write it off as more fluff as it portrays a little told side to the women who gave their skills to the Great War and the stories are based on real life accounts.

Factual
It’s rare to see a Murdoch be praised for services to journalism, but check out Gallipoli: When Murdoch Went to War (Sat, BBC2, 8.30pm). Alas it’s not Rupert, but his rather more heroic father Keith, who had a major scoop as a cub reporter when he broke the story of this massacre in Turkey during World War One. It’s a fascinating tale of Murdoch senior of how ducked military censors to report publicly on the disastrous Anzacs campaign on the peninsula. With dramatised sequences and, brace yourselves, Rupert M. adding his tuppenceworth. The highly topical Britain’s Biggest Diamond Heist? (Sun, BBC2, 10pm) investigates the audacious Hatton Garden raid at Easter. It’s barely three weeks since the gang pulled off the theft so this show has been quickly pulled together and shows it in places, but presenter Declan Lawn does a decent job of looking at the facts and talking to some of the victims of a crime destined to enter the canon of all-time great robberies.

Wastemen (Tues, BBC2, 9pm) is a new three-part fly on the wall series about the binmen of Newcastle upon Tyne. Despite efforts to increase recycling, and councils adopting a range of coloured bins to encourage us to separate our rubbish, the job is a tough one for the refuse collectors. The opening episode shows how Christmas, which generates peak trash around the UK, pushes the system to critical.

Music
It’s an oldie but a classic – the Cream Farewell Concert (Sat, Sky Arts 1, 9pm) saw the trio of Jack Bruce, Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton bow out at the Royal Albert Hall with a set of their finest songs. The acoustics are dreadful and the director ruined it with by adding special effects afterwards, but as a moment of rock history, it’s unmissable. Florence and the Machine headline Later Live with… Jools Holland (Tues, BBC2, 10pm) to showcase their new album, but of more interest perhaps are The Charlatans, the Madchester group returning to the show after a seven-year absence. US singer-songwriter James Taylor is also on the bill.

Comedy
The shift to online viewing first is well underway: Peter Kay’s Car Share (Wed, BBC1, 9.30pm) was released on iPlayer a full five days before going terrestrial. Kay’s new six-part sitcom is set among the users of a company car-sharing scheme, which is supposed to help its staff reduce their commuting misery. Like most of Kay’s work, it’s gently observational in its look at the effects of being forced to keep company with strangers. It’s not his finest work, but there are moments where classic Kay shines through. Co-star Sian Gibson is a scene-stealer.

Entertainment
Imagine if you will Anne Widdicombe dressed in rags, forced to sleep on the floor of a hovel crammed in among others, then sent to the workhouse to earn her keep by sifting bones and collecting dog shit. If only this was true, but no – she and five other slebs have to spend a mere 24 Hours in the Past (Tues, BBC1, 9pm) pretending to be members of the lowest of the Victorian working classes. Forget it’s a reality show and enjoy the fact they will all have to do this for four episodes. The sequel will feature real-life austerity victims forced into hard labour. No, I’m joking. Then again, maybe not…  

Sport
It’s the weekend of the London Marathon (Sun, BBC1/BBC2, from 8.30am) – the most prestigious street race in the UK, with thousands of participants from elite athletes to charity fundraisers in daft costumes. Notable this year for Paula Radcliffe doing it for the last time, and for the first time since she raced in 2003. Gabby Logan anchors the show, backed up by a troupe of expert commentators, and there’s additional coverage on the red button.

Election stuff
Evan Davis’ The Leader Interviews (Mon, BBC1, 7,30pm continue with Nicola Sturgeon of the SNP, the clear darling of the campaign so far and likely to inflict a crushing defeat on Labour in Scotland. The Northern Ireland Election Debate (Tues, ITV, 10.40pm) brings together representatives of the DUP, Sinn Fein, Alliance Party, Ulster Unionists and SDLP to convince a studio audience and the nation of their manifestos. The BBC English Regional Debates (Wed, BBC1, 10.50pm) continue in the same vein, looking at how the parties are faring at a local level when presenting their policies to the electorate and a panel of candidates get grilled by an audience. Make no mistake, I’m not a fan of the braying bear pit that Question Time is, so I don’t expect much from the Dimbleby-hosted Question Time Election Leaders Special (Thurs, BBC1, 8pm). DD will separately grill Cameron, Clegg and Miliband in front of a studio audience. Formulaic, prepare to be unsurprised.

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Win a signed The Town That Dreaded Sundown poster

Posted by Competitions | Thu, 23/04/2015 - 12:11

To celebrate the release of The Town That Dreaded Sundown, in UK cinemas now, we're offering 2 winners copies of acclaimed poster designer Graham Humphreys' UK exclusive quad (from a signed strictly limited run of 50), courtesy of Metrodome Distribution.

Based on a terrifying true story, director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon (American Horror Story) makes his striking feature debut with this shrewd remake of the seventies horror of the same name, inspired by the unsolved murder spree that took place in the American border town of Texarkana in 1946.

Set in a world in which the original film exists and is very much part of popular consciousness The Town That Dreaded Sundown picks up 65 years after a masked serial killer terrorized the small town. Texarkana’s quiet streets are plagued by a masked maniac who bears a striking resemblance to the same Phantom Killer who wreaked havoc decades before. Is it a copycat crime? Has somebody seen the original film too many times or is it something even more sinister?

A lonely high school girl, with dark secrets of her own, may be the key to catching the murderer in this riveting collaboration between the producers of the hit series American Horror Story and the blockbuster Paranormal Activity franchise.

For a chance to win, just follow @Screenjabber on Twitter and tweet the following text:

Follow @Screenjabber and RT for a chance to win a signed The Town That Dreaded Sundown poster

For an extra entry, just pop over and LIKE the official Screenjabber Facebook page.

The competition will close at NOON on Sunday May 3, 2014. The judges' decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

Graham Humphreys is a freelance illustrator and poster designer who has been working within the horror industry for more than 30 years, perhaps best remembered for his iconic artwork for the original UK releases of The Evil Dead and Nightmare On Elm Street as well as his original artwork for FrightFest.

Still working in a traditional paint medium, Graham continues to work within the genre he loves. http://grahamhumphreys.com/vault.html

Halloween this year will see the publication of a book of Graham's horror art, entitled Graham Humphreys: Drawing Blood. The launch will be supported by an exhibition at The Proud Gallery, London.

For further information on Metrodome Distribution's releases Twitter: @metrodomegroup Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MetrodomeDistribution #thetownthatdreadedsundown 

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Small-Screen Jabber 18-24 April

Posted by Louise Bolotin | Sat, 18/04/2015 - 10:20

By Louise Bolotin

Drama
Anything with Christopher Ecclestone (left) in it is pretty much guaranteed to be quality – he’s yet to pick a turkey of a script. And so it is with police thriller Safe House (Mon, ITV, 9pm), in which he stars as a retired detective who has turned his gorgeous, remote Lake District cottage into a safe house for those who need protection. A couple arrive and it’s soon clear they’ve been caught up in something really bad (a bit obvious – there wouldn’t be a plot otherwise). The opening episode is mostly laboured scene-setting but stick with it because there are some seriously scary moments right from the off, the brutal violence a marker for what to expect over the next four weeks. Paterson Joseph and Marsha Thomason are among a strong supporting cast.

Another chance to see: Happy Valley (Sat, BBC3, 10.10pm). Alongside Line of Duty this was last year’s top cop drama. Stars Sarah Lancashire as a beleaguered, and believable, sergeant tackling a kidnap and drug-related crime in a Yorkshire town. Dark, gritty and deservedly up for a raft of Baftas.

Factual
Fashion for bigger women has never been more in demand, as attested in Plus Sized Wars (Tues, C4, 8pm). Plus size fashion is big business as clothing chains move away from the “tents” of old to supplying up-to-the-minute styles for those wearing bigger than a size 16. Agencies are also snapping up larger women to model the clothes and appeal to the 60% of British women now classed as medically obese. This Cutting Edge film also asks if this growth industry is normalising being overweight. World’s Richest Terror Army (Wed, BBC2, 9pm) is the third of three documentaries exploring the growth of radicalised Islam, this time investigating how Islamic State has funded its rapid and brutal spread across Syria and Iraq. By looting, oil trading, extortion and theft is the answer: IS is reputed to have a war chest of £2 billion. There’s also the first TV interview with an imprisoned senior IS leader.

Music
Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds top the bill for Later Live… with Jools Holland (Tues, BBC2, 10pm). Also strutting their stuff are George Clinton with his hybrid Parliament Funkadelic (on tour right now in the UK), rapper Kendrick Lamar plus Mumford and Sons. Grizzled keyboard wizard Rick Wakeman fronts Tales from the Tour Bus: Rock ‘n’ Roll on the Road (Fri, BBC4, 9pm), which lifts the lid on the reality of life on tour for musicians, from the 1950s to the 90s. The tales of excess get a mention, but the focus is on the day to day grind for the majority of bands – missing loved ones at home, staying in cheap doss houses and eating at greasy spoons, travel in the ubiquitous Ford transit van, the roadies and, of course, the gigs… Among the stars spilling the beans are Wilko Johnson, the Damned, Happy Mondays, Suzi Quatro and the Shadows.

Arts
ITV’s Perspectives strand (Sun, ITV, 10.15pm) is less heavyweight than the BBC’s Imagine, but has thrown up some pretty good documentaries to date. The first of this latest series looks at how superstar Michael Jackson almost came to work with Britain’s urban dance troupe Diversity, an event scuppered by Jackson’s untimely death. Diversity choreographer Ashley Banjo analyses the dance moves in each video of Jackson’s six hit singles from the Thriller album, to show why and how it was the making of Jackson's solo career and why the dancing inspired so many others.

Comedy
You wait weeks for decent satire and then two come along at once. Hot on the heels of Newzoids, the Spitting Image-like puppet show, comes Ballot Monkeys (Tues, C4, 10pm). Starring Ben Miller and written by Andy Hamilton and Guy Jenkin, it’s set on the party battle buses of this very election and some of it will be written and filmed just hours before transmission to reflect actual developments in the campaign to win Downing Street. Which means it’ll either be brilliant or fall badly flat. The team is a safe pair of hands though, so my money’s on a (patchy but hilarious) success. As a bonus, the BBC satire W1A (Thurs, BBC2, 9pm) returns for a second run. Starring Hugh Bonneville as hapless Head of Values Ian Fletcher, W1A has an uncanny knack of predicting real life events, so enjoy the gags in the opening episode about an unmentionable Jeremy Clarkson.

Entertainment
In a cooked-up (groan) cross between Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares and MasterChef, Alex Polizzi: Chefs on Trial (Mon, BBC2, 8pm) sees "the fixer" attempt to find head chefs to run the kitchens of some quality restaurants in need. It’s not just about the food, although candidates have to produce some great plates – they also have to show they can manage the business side of running a fine-dining kitchen, plus there are the interviews to get through.

Sport
It’s the FA Cup semi-finals this weekend. On Saturday, Reading take on Arsenal (BBC1, 5.05pm), while Liverpool go head to head with Aston Villa (BT Sport 1, 2pm). Both matches are on at Wembley.

Election stuff
The Leader Interviews (Mon/Wed, BBC1, 7.30pm) continue this week, as Evan Davis grills first Ed Miliband then Nigel Farage.

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WIN DUMB AND DUMBER TO ON BLU-RAY

Posted by Competitions | Fri, 17/04/2015 - 16:38

To celebrate the release of Dumb and Dumber To on Blu-ray and DVD from 20th April, we’re giving FIVE lucky winners the chance to get their hands on a copy of the film on Blu-Ray.

This spring, Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels reprise their signature roles as everyone’s favourite dumbest duo, Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne, in the unforgettable sequel to 1994s’s smash hit, Dumb and Dumber.

Dumb and Dumber To sees the cast reunite with directors Peter and Bobby Farrelly for the laugh-out-loud sequel. Twenty years after the dimwits embarked on their first adventure, Lloyd has been committed to a mental institution, but during one of his regular visits, Harry discovers that it has been an epic two decade prank and he’s been well and truly had. Now that the joke is up, Lloyd leaves with Harry and is soon devastated to learn that Harry is in urgent need of a kidney transplant.

After finding out he may have fathered an illegitimate child that could be his only hope of finding a donor, Harry enlists Lloyd’s help to track her down. The intellectually-challenged pair embark on a hilarious road trip across America, accidentally finding themselves embroiled in a life-threatening plot. With their lives at stake, will the hapless twosome survive?

For a chance to win, just follow @Screenjabber on Twitter and tweet the following text:

Follow @Screenjabber and RT for a chance to win Dumb and Dumber To on Blu-ray.

For an extra entry, just pop over and LIKE the official Screenjabber Facebook page.

The competition will close at NOON on Sunday April 26, 2014. The judges' decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

© 2015 Universal Studios. All Rights Reserved.

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Trafalgar Square Lions scare London tourists for DVD release of NATM3

Posted by luke | Wed, 15/04/2015 - 20:24

Last week to promote the Blu-ray & DVD release of Night at the Museum Secret of the Tomb (out now) we played a little trick on unsuspecting Trafalgar Square tourists!

If you are unfamiliar with the film, the basis of the story line is that a magical tablet brings artifacts and exhibits to life. We thought, what better way to celebrate the final installment in the trilogy by bringing London's lions to life?

Here is a video to watch what happened when we placed a recording device next to one of the lions in London's busy Trafalgar Square...

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Small-Screen Jabber 11-17 April

Posted by Louise Bolotin | Fri, 10/04/2015 - 16:52

By Louise Bolotin

Drama
Set in the exotic South Pacific, Tatau (Sun, BBC3, 10pm) follows BBC3’s traditional offering of supernatural dramas full of ghostly goings-on, vampires and zombies. Backpackers Kyle and Budgie arrive in the Cook Islands – Kyle’s tribal tattoo disturbs the locals and he starts having visions after a few glugs of a sacred hallucinogenic drink. Starring Joe Layton and Theo Barklem-Biggs (left), it’s eight episodes long and you’ll need to stick with it for longer than this opener to get a grasp on it. Game of Thrones (Mon, Sky Atlantic, 9pm) returns for a fifth series – the opening episode is a bit tame as it catches up previous backstories, but rest assured the bloodthirstiness will be ramped up soon as…

Factual
Russia was taken off the world’s Christmas card list last year, what with the conflict in Ukraine and the worsening climate for its gay community. Reggie Yates’ Extreme Russia (Mon, BBC3, 9pm) sees him meet some very odd and unpleasant characters, more odd and unpleasant than Putin, as he mingles with the country’s far right. Racism is also increasing there and Yates is soon plunged into the major nastiness of knifings and neo-nazis. This three-parter explores different aspects in subsequent episodes. Kill the Christians (Wed, BBC2, 9pm) investigates how Christianity is seriously under threat in the Middle East, as Islamic fundamentalists find Christians an easy target. Journalist Jane Corbin uncovers harrowing stories of torture, persecution and murder in Syria and Iraq at the hands of Isis. The effect of such savagery could unbalance the region even further.

Music
The opener of the latest series of Later Live…with Jools Holland (Tues, BBC2, 10pm) is a corker – Blur (newly reformed after a 16-year hiatus), Marc Almond, the Vaccines and Laura Marling, plus a punk band from Mali and some bluesy jazz. Let’s hope this a taster for the next eight weeks. Pop alchemy is the secret for How to Make a Number 1 Record (Fri, BBC4, 9pm). DJ Janice Long explores what makes a great pop song and how to get it to the top of the charts – it’s a combination of art, science, chance and manipulation, apparently. The majestic roll call of chart-busting pop stars chipping in includes Don Black, Noddy Holder, David Hepworth, Gerry Marsden and Chris Difford. It’s followed by an hour’s compilation of one-hit wonder number 1s.

Arts
The best of the year’s theatre is celebrated in the Olivier Awards (Sun, ITV, 10.15pm). Lenny Henry is this year’s MC, at the Royal Opera House. There’s a fine list of nominees this year – not just musicals, but also revivals of classics like A Streetcar Named Desire and new work from the Young Vic. Veteran Kevin Spacey is set to receive a special award.

Comedy
Politics has been short of satire for too long and a good dose of it is just what this election needs, in the shape of Newzoids (Wed, ITV, 9pm). This puppet sketch show is topical and surreal, just as the much-lamented Spitting Image was, and lampoons not just politicians but TV celebs, sporting greats and pop stars. Impressionists Jon Culshaw and Debra Stephenson are among the voices and no one is safe. From the writers of Green Wing comes The Delivery Man (Wed, ITV, 9.30pm) – it stars Darren Boyd as an ex-copper who retrained as a midwife and is set in, you guessed, a maternity ward. It’s a classic fish out of water set-up, with a tight script, some great gags and a supporting casts that includes Paddy McGuinness and Fay Ripley.

Sport
Saturday has a triple bill if you’re armchair-bound. First up is The Grand National (Sat, C4, from 1pm). Nick Luck anchors the coverage, with the main race under starter’s orders at 4.15pm. That clashes with The Boat Races (Sat, BBC1, 4.15pm) but you’ll only miss the opening commentary if you want to watch the steeplechase. This year, the women’s race has equal billing to the men’s – the former is at 4.50pm and the latter at 5.50pm. In the evening the US Masters (Sat, BBC2, 7.30pm, Sun 6.30pm) is the first major day of the golf contest, with Northern Ireland’s Rory McIlroy looking to get this scalp.

Election stuff
Evan Davis does the grilling in The Leader Interviews (Mon/Wed, BBC, 8pm) in the plush surrounds of London’s Francis Crick Institute. Clegg is first in the hot seat, followed by Cameron (and the rest follow next week). Evans can be tough when he’s a mind to, so what the leaders try to waffle about could be interesting, and as an economics journalist you can expect him to pin Cameron down on Tory economic policy. And so to the BBC Election Debate (Thurs, BBC1, 8pm). Don’t expect Cameron – he’s already done the sole one he was prepared to do, and Clegg has also excused himself. The BBC is dubbing the five remaining leaders as “the challengers”, which is hardly fair on Miliband. David Dimbleby is chairing so expect a Question Time style bear pit.

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US Box Office Report

Posted by Stuart OConnor | Mon, 06/04/2015 - 12:47

Furious 7 breaks all April records

By Rich Matthews

The latest instalment in the Fast & The Furious franchise, and Paul Walker's last film before his untimely death in a car accident, left Captain America: The Winter Soldier's April opening record of $95m in the dust. Screeching off the starting line with $143.6m domestic and $384m worldwide, Universal's Furious 7 – starring Vin Diesel, Walker, Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Jason Statham – easily bested any other entry in the automotive series and was the biggest US opening since The Hunger Games: Catching Fire in November 2013. It was also the fourth highest worldwide opening behind Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2's $483.2m, Harry Potter And The Half-Blood Prince's $394.4m and The Avengers' $392.5m. And it still hasn't even opened in China yet (that has to wait until April 12).

This mammoth success builds on Universal's Fifty Shades Of Grey, which passed the $400m mark internationally this weekend to take its global gross to $566m. All in, the homegrown box office was up a hefty 31 per cent over last year and a gigantic 65 per cent over 2013. If it keeps up this frenetic pace, Furious 7 should zoom past Fast and Furious 6's worldwide gross of $789m – suddenly the studio's plan for at least three more entries in the franchise seems conservative. It's also safe to say that the summer blockbuster season now starts in April and the potential for Avengers: Age of Ultron on May 1 is massive indeed.

The only other new release that hit the top 10 was the Weinstein Company's Woman In Gold starring Helen Mirren and Ryan Reynolds at number seven with $2m, setting a per theatre average of $7,677m by providing canny counter-programming that appealed to the over-50s. A couple of other landmarks were crossed, with Disney's Kenneth Branagh-helmed live action version of Cinderella placing fourth with $10.3m ($167.3m US, $397.3m worldwide), ready to pass $400m globally on Monday, and The Divergent Series: Insurgent coming in fifth with $10m to pass $100m US ($103.4m, $223.6m worldwide).

At third, Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart's prison-themed comedy Get Hard took in a respectable $13m ($57m, $67.3m), while acclaimed horror film It Follows held on to come sixth ($2.5m, $8.5m). After Mirren and Reynolds at seven, the chart was rounded out by Matthew Vaughn's slow-burn hit comic-book adaptation Kingsman: The Secret Service ($1.7m, $122.3m, $369.8m), Christian propaganda flick Do You Believe? ($1.5m, $9.8m) and pensioner comedy drama sequel The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel ($1m, $30.1m, $73.4m).

Plenty opens in the rest of April – including Kevin James in sequel Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 and more low-key release Little Boy – but it's just a preamble for the arrival of Ultron, so expect Furious 7 to burn up the competition before May 1. Following hot on the heels of Ultron will be big buzz post-apocalyptic prequel Mad Max: Fury Road and Pitch Perfect 2 on May 15, and Disney's Brad Bird sci-fi blockbuster Tomorrowland and horror remake Poltergeist on May 22.

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